Friday, August 21, 2015

Done!

Done!!!! Yes, that's right, after three weeks of knotting, and occasionally unknotting thread, I have finished the Armenian lace doily. The finished piece is about 14.5 inches across with size 30 vintage ecru thread. I almost killed the ball of thread with the piece, though it was partially used to begin with.

Let's see, what did this piece teach me? Well I think I'm no expert in this fiber art, I have gotten the knot down cold and I understand the spacing needed for the stitches to look right. I did learn that I have a lot to learn about making a piece without a written pattern. About halfway through, I completely miscounted and ended up with a frilly mess. Luckily I managed to mostly tame the frill, but it took an iron to get it completely. I'm definitely going to use these skills to make something for the shop, but what I've no concrete idea. I've been so focused on completing this project before schooling begins that I haven't given any real thought to anything else.

No, I have no plans to sell this. I couldn't begin to price something that took this much time and ended up as just a doily. Of course even if I could, I'm such a novice and this piece is full of mistakes. It just wouldn't be a sellable piece. So the plan is to frame it instead. I already acquired a frame, I just need a nice black background for it. Of course I also need to figure out the best way to get it tacked down without ruining it. That's a new one for me since I've never framed tatting. If anyone reading this does, I'd love to hear how you do it. That's it for me then. I think I'm going to just rest for a bit with this feeling of accomplishment, though honestly, that probably won't even make it through the day.


6 comments:

Jane McLellan said...

Wow, well done. I've really enjoyed watching your learning process and I think the final product looks great.

Bernice said...

I really like the look of this. You are a very quick learner. Congratulations on completion.

SWtrompeter said...

Seems like the recommended way for framing needlework is to use a mat so the thread and glass don't touch each other - you don't want to mash the thread. (Unfortunately I don't remember WHY you don't want to mash the thread and WHY it is so 'important' that you mat the piece so the glass and thread don't tough each other.) How about black velvet as the backing? Sew it onto the backing with invisible thread - just enough sewing to keep the doily from sagging over time, since the glass won't be pushing against it to hold it firmly in place.

Your doily looks fabulous. You finished it so quickly, too! You definitely are a fast learner.


Carolyn said...

So lovely and delicate. Certainly has been fun and instructive watching the progress.

Kathy C said...

Re: How to frame tatting/lace and attach it to backing....I have framed tatted pieces many times. There are other ways to do this but here is how I do mine. It has worked out very well...some of my framed pieces are 20+ years old now. First, I double mat my pieces so that the tatting never touches the frame glass, otherwise the cotton tatting will decay over time. Since I always cut my own acid free mats, I always have matting available as backings for lace and tatting. First, I block my tatting, then I lay the tatting over the acid free mat backing I have selected. Using an awl, I poke very small holes through the matting that my needle will just fit through so the holes will not be visible in the end product. Then I use invisible thread to sew the tatting to the backing using the very tiny holes I punched with the awl. It works great, is practically invisible and you get faster at it as you begin to think about the structure of the tatting and where to stitch it to the backing. Hope this helps. -Kathy

Fox said...

Amazing...